The Short List and a tall stack

501 (PharP) Applied Patient Care I: Patient Assessment 1 (0-3) Prereq admission to PharD program. Laboratory course teaching hands-on physical assessment techniques from a pharmacy perspective, to provide patient-specific care. S, F grading.

502 (PharS 551) Integrated Pharmacology I 3 Prereq admission to PharD program. Medicinal chemistry, drug metabolism, signal transduction, drug development and autonomic pharmacology.

503 (PharS 500) Pathophysiology with Medical Terminology 4 Prereq admission to PharD program. Review of human physiology along with an overview of human pathophysiology, including medical terminology.

504 (PharS 510) Pharmacy Calculations 1 (0-3) Prereq admission to PharD program. Familiarizes students with the drugs most frequently prescribed in the US, as a basis for pharmacy practice. S, F grading.

505 (PharP 500) Pharmacy Practice Foundations 2 Prereq admission to PharD program. Perspectives into the profession of pharmacy; pharmacy law, ethics, and careers.

507 (PharP 510) Introduction to Therapeutic Agents: Top 200 Drugs 1 (0-3) Prereq admission to PharD program. Drugs most frequently prescribed in the US as a basis for pharmacy practice.

508 (PharS 521) Pharmaceutics I 3 Prereq admission to PharD program. Principles of dosage form design and drug delivery, with an emphasis on physiochemical principles.

509 (PharP 521) Professional Communications Lab 1 (0-3) Prereq admission to PharD program. Professional communication skills as an essential foundation for career development.

That, my friends, is the short list. Fall 2010: a concise, deceivingly short compilation of what we’ll be tossed into. And what a glorious short list it is! Perspectives into the profession of pharmacy! Top 200 Drugs!  Dosage forms and drug delivery! So specific! No more adjectives like ‘general’ or ‘overview’ or ‘entire’; we get to focus on physiology and anatomy and microbiology from a single viewpoint: pharmaceutics. I can’t hardly wait. And I don’t have to…I’m the proud new owner of a very very thick medical dictionary, a tome entitled “Clinical Pharmacology”, and a beasty bound book called “Pharmacotherapy”, all courtesy of my wise mentor-pharmacist.

When they’re stacked all together, they’re about 15 inches tall. I think I’ll use them for dead lifts and shoulder-presses during study breaks. Why not, right?

Will I crack open their overly-informing pages before school? Perhaps. Or maybe I’ll stick to my iced tea, my back porch, and books that are less than 2 inches thick.

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